Mixed Greens Blog

Mixed Greens Blog
Living Sustainably in the Pacific Northwest

28
April
2013

Gluten-Free Bread Winner

gluten-free seed bread

I’m not gluten intolerant but when I came across a recipe for a “Life-Changing Bread”, I’ll have to say that I was intrigued. I had my doubts that any one food can change your life, but this bread has come pretty close to doing just that. It would probably be more accurate to say that it’s become part of my life in that Charlie and I eat it for lunch practically everyday and I’ve started baking a loaf once a week or so. It contains some of the same ingredients as my homemade granola and I’ve found making them at the same time saves me effort. I guess that’s part of what it’s all about. Cooking at home instead of buying processed food takes some effort, there’s no way around that, but the benefits are great and besides, this bread is very low on the effort scale and very high on the healthy scale.  While I haven’t found a way to incorporate local ingredients (you can substitute hazelnuts for the almonds) into the recipe, you can put any number of local treats on top. I’ve had lots requests from friends for the recipe, I thought it was time to share it with you.

Gluten-free seed bread

I have to give full credit for this life-changing bread recipe to Sarah Britton at My New Roots, one of my favorite healthy eating blogs. I highly recommend checking out her post on this bread especially if you have questions about making substitutions or want to know more about the benefits of psyllium seed husks. I can tell you right now that psyllium seed husks are the ingredient that makes it possible to leave out the flour in this bread. It absorbs the water and binds all the other ingredients together. I’ve used Sarah’s recipe but changed it slightly to suit my needs.

gluten-free seed bread

 Life-Changing Bread Recipe

Ingredients: 1 cup sunflower seeds/ 1/2 cup whole flax seeds, I prefer golden flax/ 1/2 cup chopped almonds/ 1 1/2 cups rolled oats/ 2T chia seeds/ 4T psyllium seed husks/ 1t fine grain sea salt/ 1T maple syrup/ 3T unsalted melted butter, plus a little extra to butter your pan/ 1 1/2 cups water.

Ingredients for gluten-free bread

Directions: Butter a loaf pan (the original recipe uses a silicon loaf pan, so skip the butter if you have one)/ Put all the dry ingredients into a large mixing bowl and mix well/ Meanwhile in a small saucepan, melt the butter, remove from the heat, add the maple syrup and water/ Add the wet ingredients together with the dry and mix well/ Put into your loaf pan and smooth the top with the back of spoon/ Let it sit out on the counter for at least 2 hours, or all day or even overnight (I’ve tried all three with good success).

Uncooked Gluten-free Bread

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees/ Place loaf pan on middle rack and bake for 20 minutes/ Remove loaf pan from oven and turn it upside-down on a baking rack/ Return to the oven (on top of the rack) and bake for 35 minutes longer to cook the underside/ Cool bread completely before slicing. It smells amazing so this is the hardest part.

seedbread1 of 1 (1)

I keep mine in a sealed container in the fridge and slice it off as I need it. One loaf lasts about a week for the two of us. Charlie takes a couple of slices to work slathered with butter, of course. I prefer it toasted but since it can crumble, I like to stick it under the broiler until it’s brown and toasty. The lone tablespoon of maple syrup and the nature sweetness of the nuts and seeds makes it plenty sweet for me but if you’re so inclined, I’m certain it would be delicious with homemade jam. I always tend toward the savory side so here’s my new favorite lunch — toasted bread with butter and lots of chopped herbs straight from the garden. Another favorite is butter, sliced farmers market radishes and a bit of sea salt.

Chopped Herbs on Gluten-free Bread

If you’re in the mood to make some changes in your life, trying something new, even bread, is a great place to start. I can feel my life is changing already.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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8 Responses »

  1. Mine, too, and for the better.

    Thanks for spreading the word to the MixedGreensers. I agree, this one is a serious Bread Winner.

  2. Poppy I am so excited you posted this bread. I will try it soon with an olive oil replacement for the butter.
    Also, folks will want to get gluten free oats. Very exciting! Pam

  3. Pam, I forgot to mention the original recipe calls for coconut oil or ghee instead of butter and yes, gluten free oats if that’s an issue. Thanks for reminding me and let me know how olive oil works.

  4. I have given up eating bread and feel so much better for it although I don’t think I am gluten intolerant. I do miss something to eat instead of bread and this looks like it can fill the void. I shall go and buy the ingredients tomorrow and have a go at baking it. It looks delicious.

  5. Hi Poppy

    The first batch I used a bit of butter and coconut oil AND forgot the nuts! Still delicious. Last night I made
    two small loaves from one recipe, used all coconut oil and remembered the nuts. They are currently
    in the oven. I wanted to send one off with Pamm to art retreat on Vashon. I will be taking the other to
    Lopez as a house gift.

    We mostly toasted ours in frying pan, camping style.

  6. Pam, thanks for letting me know how it went. Great idea to toast in the frying pan, I’ll do that while on Orcas.
    Enjoy your weekend getaways!

  7. Hi,
    My friend Liz Krengel emailed me this recipe. Any suggestions on what to do to adjust to high altitude…I live in Colorado. Usually I add flour but there’s no flour. Sorry I am domestically challenged. This bread looks yummy!
    Cici

  8. Thanks so much for this recipe, Poppy! I am making it pretty frequently to keep and share. I am not following a gluten free diet myself, but I have a very good friend who is and this makes a nice little gift to give her now and then. Now that the weather is getting colder and the oven is sometimes on again, it’s fun to make bread. This one is delicious and very filling. A couple slices with not much else makes a meal.